Menu

Off the Hook: 6 Games with Fun Fishing Minigames

Fishing is considered a relaxing and satisfying hobby for many. As someone who lives on the coast and hates early mornings, it mostly looks cold and muddy. Fishing minigames have me suitably hooked, though. That calming presence easily washes over me, when I don’t have to be near an actual fish. Here’s a look at six of the most enjoyable ways to fish virtually.

The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time

Everything about Ocarina of Time is quite wonderful. Its fishing minigame is just as delightful. Available by uncovering a fishing hole in Lake Hyrulia, it’s an optional extra but one that soon becomes quite gripping.

Utilizing the Nintendo 64’s analog stick, you can manipulate the line, luring fish in. If you were fortunate enough to own a rumble pack, you could even ‘feel’ the fish tugging to get away. It was a tactile experience at a time when such technology was still relatively new, cementing Ocarina of Time as one of the most memorable fishing experiences out there.

World of Warcraft

Fishing in World of Warcraft is a rare moment of calm. Ideal for when you don’t feel like grinding experience and completing quests, fishing is a simple tradeskill to get into. Simply buy a fishing rod, and let it loose on some water. Keeping an eye out for a twitching fish is key to luring them in. You can buy various special lures, as well as better fishing rods, but World of Warcraft keeps it pretty simple.

The beauty here is in simply enjoying taking a breather, while still feeling like you’re achieving something. It’s surprisingly calming.

Animal Crossing: New Leaf

Almost everything about the Animal Crossing series is immensely relaxing, but fishing is a particular delight. New Leaf is the pick of the crop, with it being wonderfully compelling. Working much like World of Warcraft, a keen eye is required to see just when to reel the fish in. It’s even simpler than that, given you don’t really need to do much else, but that’s why it’s so successful.

You can easily leave your worries behind, while being increasingly excited about catching a new kind of fish to add to your collection. A little bored? You can switch to catching bugs–but that’s a whole other story.

Dark Cloud 2

Dark Cloud 2 was an underrated RPG for the PS2, that offered plenty of fun diversions from simply winning the day. It’s fishing minigame was a particular highlight. More involved than you’d expect, you needed to set different bait, and manipulate the lure carefully to pull fish in.

Unusually, once you caught the fish, there were more options of what you could do with them. You could get the fish to race in a ‘Finny Frenzy’, train them up by feeding them decent bait, and even change their gender by giving them a carrot. Breeding was also an option, plus there were fishing contests leading to special prizes.

Okami

Fishing in Okami was far from relaxing, but it was certainly satisfying. Brush strokes formed your fishing line with Amaterasu painting a line from the fisherman to the fish. Once connected, there was a lot of button mashing to have any chance of succeeding.

As you progressed, so did the prey involved. Soon enough, you’d be pursuing manta rays rather than crabs. It might have never been easy, but success was a good feeling. More importantly, some of the time, it was essential in order to progress the plot.

The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening

Another Zelda game? The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening was a fairly rudimentary form of fishing, but that’s what worked so well for it. In a game full of minigames that could lead to great prizes, Link could head to a small fishing pond to wile away his free time trying to lure in a big fish. You could always see the fish coming. It was just a matter of casting your lure at just the right time, and being able to pull it back in quickly enough.

Keep at it, and you’d be eventually rewarded with a piece of heart, going towards boosting your overall health. It was a small but important reward for hard work.

Jennifer Allen
Jennifer is a freelancer for multiple outlets on the web and in print, including Playboy, Paste Magazine, TechRadar, and MyM Magazine. In her spare time, she watches too many TV boxsets and pretends she knows what she’s doing at the gym. Follow her on Twitter.
  Click to upvote this post!

Jennifer Allen
Jennifer is a freelancer for multiple outlets on the web and in print, including Playboy, Paste Magazine, TechRadar, and MyM Magazine. In her spare time, she watches too many TV boxsets and pretends she knows what she’s doing at the gym. Follow her on Twitter.

Featured Let’s Play